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ARTS, MEDIA AND PUBLISHING

If you have an active imagination and a creative flair, then a career in Arts, Media & Publishing might be perfect for you. The industry employs more than 2 million people, and some its’ biggest names started out doing an apprenticeship. This includes the likes of Stella McCartney and Alexander Mcqueen! Highly creative industries like this are especially beneficial to learn while you gain industry experience, as it allows you to build a portfolio of your work, while gaining inspiration by working alongside industry professionals. However, this industry isn’t just for creatives. There are other opportunities, such as administrative and technical - think studio engineering or studio recording!

If you’ve found the ideal AMP job for you there’s just a few things you may want to know about how the application process for these roles usually work...

Your pathway into
the industry

1

Check for local opportunities that might boost your CV. Many employers in this industry provide volunteering or work experience opportunities - an excellent way to stand out from the crowd!

2

Using our CV Builder and helpful CV guide create your skills-based CV. Don’t worry too much - we are here to help if need be.

3

Once you have submitted your CV to us one of our Recruitment Resourcers will be in touch to find out what kinds of roles you are after and help fill in any CV gaps if there are any. If you feel confident, there are loads of jobs on our website you can start applying for straight away!

4

Now we know what type of role you’re looking for we’ll help you nd a position and conduct a mock interview so you feel super prepared for that all important next step. Don’t worry if you can’t find what you’re looking for on our website - our team can point you in the right direction if this is the case.

5

If your application is successful and you’re called in for an interview we can provide support in multiple areas, including travel planning, budgeting and more.

Job listings


Unfortunately, we don't have any jobs relating to this industry right now, but you may find what you're looking for here...

https://nationalcareers.service.gov.uk
https://www.gov.uk/apply-apprenticeship
https://www.apprenticeships.gov.uk/
https://www.ucas.com/

Required Skills & Qualifications

Entry requirements vary, depending on the level of apprenticeship you want to apply for. For intermediate, you will need to have GCSEs or equivalent. For advanced roles, you’re likely to need at least 3 GCSEs at grade C or above. This can very - so be sure to check the entry criteria for any roles you apply for!

Want to learn more? Contact our friendly team

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Journalist

Myth busting

Journalism is perfect for anyone who loves writing, and enjoys keeping up with current affairs. Whilst in recent times, some Journalists have received backlash for unethical practice, it’s still a rewarding and highly sought after career path! Journalism also gives you the opportunity to choose an expertise that you really enjoy - think tech journalists or food critics!

Editors can earn anything upwards of £45k p/a
Job Role Progression: • Junior Reporter • Reporter • Senior Reporter • News/features Editor • Editor

Finer Details

There’s something to suit every budding Journalist out there, including national & local newspapers, television, magazines, online publications and more!

Main Responsibilities May Include:
• Interviewing people.
• Attending press conferences and asking questions.
• Writing and researching stories.
• Creating and uploading content to your publications website.
• Attending events, such as launch parties and premieres.

The good points...

Journalists are always chasing the latest news and stories, being on top of current affairs can be really fulfilling for those with a keen interest. Being a journalist can also get you a fast track invite to some pretty cool events too!

... and the bad

Journalism is a highly competitive industry, so you will have to stand out from the crowd. Additionally, there’s a lot of pressure around the role due to tight deadlines. National newspapers hit shelves at the crack of dawn every day - that’s a lot of content!

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TV Runner

Myth busting

If you want to enter the exciting television production, an entry level role at TV Runner might be the best starting point. While it might not be the most glamorous role in the industry, its an excellent way to gain essential TV experience and work alongside industry professionals.

Typically, salaries for Runners are low. However, roles are still highly sought after as they’re recognised as a brilliant way to gain crucial experience!
Job Progression: • Runner • Researcher • Production Assistant • Production Coordinator • Producer

Finer Details

This is a paid position, so while the salary is low, you would still be luckier than unpaid interns who receive no pay at all!

Responsibilities May Include:
• Cleaning up sets once they aren’t in use.
• Making beverages for crew and cast.
• Getting lunch for everyone on set.
• Meeting and greeting guests.
• General admin tasks.

The good points...

The world of television is one of the most highly sought after, and can come with lots of perks and benefits as you progress in your career. The level of onset experience being a TV Runner provides, can open a lot of doors. Just think of it as a step to building your dream career!

... and the bad

The low salary can be particularly undesirable, and on top of this there are very long working hours. However, despite all of this, TV runner opportunities are still highly oversubscribed!

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Assistant Copy Editor

Myth busting

Copy editors ensure that all text in a publication is perfect before it goes to publish. This means checking that text is readable, flows well, grammatically correct and accurate. You will have the ability to work on a range of publications, including magazines, newspapers and books. If you want to work for yourself, there’s also the opportunity to go freelance if desired.

A chief sub-editor with experience can earn around £60k p/a!
Job Progression: • Assistant Copy Editor • Copy Editor • Senior Copy Editor • Chief Sub-editor

Finer Details

Working hours are typically normal office hours, but you may have to occasionally work evenings to meet deadlines.

Responsibilities May Include:
• Ensuring that length of text fits within publishing requirements.
• Checking for legal issues, such as breach of copyright.
• Correcting spelling, grammar and punctuation.
• Ensuring that references are quoted correctly.
• Making sure that the meaning of text is clear and easy to understand.

The good points...

If you choose to go freelance, you will have the opportunity to work from home, and manage your own working hours!

... and the bad

This role is heavily desk based and involves a lot of staring at a screen – therefore if you like more social, interactive or hands on environments, this role may not be for you.

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Media Sales

Myth busting

Media sales is an industry that’s always evolving, and relies on dedicated sales teams to promote various avenues. This role is perfect for you if you’re outgoing, personable and enjoy keeping up with industry trends. Media sales can come in the form of telesales, or can even provide travel opportunities to meet face to face with clients!

A media sales manager can earn upwards of £65k p/a!
Job Progression: • Telephone Advertising Sales Executive • Field Sales Executive • Senior Account Manager • Sales Manager • Sales Director

Finer Details

Media Sales is great for driven, determined and motivated individuals. It’s highly target driven and you should be prepared to work additional hours to meet deadlines.

Responsibilities May Include:
• Develop new leads.
• Cold call potential clients.
• Manage existing customer relationships.
• Face to face meetings.
• Closing deals.

The good points...

There are usually financial bonuses for meeting targets, and it’s a highly sociable role. If you love meeting new people, travelling and consider yourself to be a social butterfly - you’re likely to succeed at this role!

... and the bad

You can be expected to work long hours to meet targets, and field sales executives may have to travel long distances and stay overnight. This could potentially eat into your own personal and social time.

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Literary Agent

Myth busting

A Literary Agent can choose to work for themselves or part of an organisation. Working freelance can come with a range of benefits, including the opportunity to travel, flexible working hours, and so on. You’ll need to be an excellent communicator and keep up to date with the industry, as much of the job involves building relationships with publishers and promoting your clients.

A literary agent can earn around £60k p/a!
Job Progression: • Publisher • Consultant • Literary Agent

Finer Details

Freelance Literary Agents have the opportunity to manage their schedule and workload, however there may be uncertain time periods if they are lacking clients.

Responsibilities May Include:
• Negotiate business deals between publishers and authors.
• Providing feedback to authors.
• Promoting clients to relevant press.
• Advising authors on contract details.
• Building relationships with publishing houses.

The good points...

Literary agents can have the opportunity to attend some really cool industry events, such as launches. This involves lots of networking, so if you’re a social butterfly that could be for you!

... and the bad

Working hours can be irregular and long, and can involve some weekend work. This role isn’t for someone looking for a strict 9-5 working week.

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Graphic Designer

Myth busting

Common misconceptions about Graphic Designers is that they are hidden away behind a computer screen all day and barely socialise - but this definitely isn’t the case! Whilst most of their work is carried out on a computer, they will also require excellent customer service and communication skills to engage with clients. Graphic Designers are highly creative individuals, whose work effectively supports the sales of products and services across the world. This comes with high expectations and a lot of responsibility.

Senior graphic designers can tend to earn upwards of £44k p/a
Job Progression: • Junior Graphic Designer
• Middleweight Graphic Designer
• Senior Graphic Designer
• Design Director
• Creative Director

Finer Details

Graphic Designers can work in-house for an employer, for an agency, or if you want more freedom, you can go freelance!

Responsibilities May Include:
• Using industry software to create visually impactful designs.
• Presenting draft designs to client for feedback.
• Attending client meetings to discuss briefs and design expectations.
• Working with other creatives such as copyrights.
• Work on a range of projects, such as social media, packaging, and branding.

The good points...

Being a Graphic Designer can see you work on some really cool projects, and give you the opportunity to collaborate with other creative professionals. Freelance Graphic Designers can also have the added benefit of working for themselves!

... and the bad

Graphic Designers have to be thick skinned - and be used to having their drafts designs criticised by clients! You will also be expected to work longer hours to meet deadlines when required.

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Project Editor

Myth busting

You might think that project editors are stuck behind a screen all day proof reading documents - but you couldn’t be more wrong. The role of a project editor is highly varied, and gives the opportunity to work on multiple assignments. To be successful in this role, you will need to have excellent communication skills, be self motivated and have the ability to prioritise your time and juggle a busy workload!

A Senior Project Editor can earn upwards of £40k p/a!
Job Progression: • Editorial Assistant
• Development Editor
• Editor
• Project Editor
• Senior Commissioning Editor

Finer Details

Project Editors usually work normal office hours, however they may be required to stay for longer periods of time in order to meet deadlines.

Responsibilities May Include:
• Editing and proofreading documents.
• Coordinate with colleagues to ensure projects meet deadlines.
• Follow company guide style to ensure content is consistent.
• Review and edit documents before publication.
• Shadow Senior Project editors to ensure all projects run smoothly and efficiently.

The good points...

There are really clear progression pathways, with the opportunity to have hands on involvement with some really exciting projects. You’ll get to work with a wide range of people across your organisation too - giving you the opportunity to develop crucial skills.

... and the bad

Project Editors need a keen eye for detail at all times, especially when proofreading content before publishing. If you feel you struggle to concentrate or tend to daydream - this may not bode well!

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Assistant Publisher

Myth busting

Finer Details

The good points...

... and the bad